The Flash Steel Conference


Schedule

 Tuesday, October 26 

Track

Session (Session links found here)

Speaker

Time (Eastern)

Keynote

Tuesday Keynote: Evolution of the Structural Engineering Profession 
With all the talk of 5G networks, Zoom, and e-commerce, it's hard to believe that in the 1970s and 1980s designers were still producing paper drawings and hand-delivering them to job sites. Jon Magnusson has been a leading designer since joining Magnusson Klemencic Associates in 1976. In the past decade alone, he has been the structural engineer-in-charge for over $2 billion of construction. In this fast-paced keynote, he'll walk us through the design industry changes that have made structural engineering better and faster.

Jon Magnusson

11:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Connections

Common Mistakes Made by New Connection Designers
Are you new to designing connections? We're here to help you avoid some of the mistakes new designers make most frequently. Mara Braselton will walk you through common pitfalls to improve your connection design accuracy and efficiency.

Mara Braselton

11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Connections

Drawing Details: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly – Revisited
Unique connection conditions can call for creative details, but those details bring their own set of challenges. A bad detail may lack a valid load path, while another may be difficult to fabricate or install. We'll help you distinguish the good details from the bad and the ugly and clearly convey this information in the contract drawings.

Mike Kempfert

12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Connections

Who Wants To Be Smarter Than A Fabricator?
Think you know your connection design and fabrication best practices? Join your host, a steel fabricator project manager with decades of experience, for the quiz show that puts your knowledge to the test. You may not win a million dollars, but this interactive presentation will help you avoid those last-minute whammys that can cost you time and money.

Jonathan Hamann 

2:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

Connections

Five Things Structural Engineers Need to Know about Welded Connections 
When it comes to welded connections and associated design provisions, you might know the what, but do you know the why? We'll spark your understanding of all the things you need to know.

Curtis Decker

2:45 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

Rehab and Retrofit

An Introduction to Steel Rehab and Retrofit Work
When it comes to evaluating and strengthening historic steel framing, it can be difficult to know where to start. We'll introduce the relevant building code sections and industry standards used to analyze existing members and discuss the procedures for determining historic steel section properties and evaluating the weldability of older steels. We'll also introduce several reinforcing schemes that can add strength to existing beams, columns, and connections.

Joseph Schuster

3:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Rehab and Retrofit

Why We Retrofit Older Buildings for Seismic Loads
Millions of buildings in the U.S. are located in seismically active regions, and many of them predate our modern understanding of seismic design--putting them at increased risk for damage in earthquakes. We'll go over how buildings are chosen for seismic upgrades as well as retrofitting requirements and methods, with examples from recent steel structures.

Dan Sloat

4:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m.

Wednesday, October 27

Track

Session

Speaker

Time (Eastern)

Keynote

Wednesday Keynote -- Flash Update: The Need for Speed
AISC has embarked on a mission to increase the speed at which a steel project (either a building or a bridge) can be designed, fabricated, and erected by 50% by the end of 2025. Learn about the progress of various projects supported by AISC and how they will shape the future of steel construction.

Devin Huber

11:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Rehab and Retrofit

Assessing the Strength Properties of Old, Unidentified Structural Steel
Let's say you've been asked to assess the strength of members in a building where there is no conclusive identification of the strength grade of the structural steel used. Or you’ve been asked to confirm that the steel in an existing building definitively conforms to an obsolete standard that is listed on the drawings. Where would you start? We'll walk you through how to develop an appropriate sampling plan for the existing structural steel that takes into account the likelihood that multiple production heats of steel were used to construct the building. We'll also describe a reliability-based procedure you can use in the statistical analysis of the tensile test results to determine an equivalent specified minimum yield strength.

Conrad Paulson 

11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Rehab and Retrofit

Historic Steel Test: A Case Study in Developing a Material Testing Plan
Get an inside look at a tenant renovation within a Chicago building that was constructed in 1905. The team had to carefully consider how to connect the new steel to the historical steel--without knowing the specification to which the old steel was manufactured. They turned to steel tensile properties testing and metallurgical examination, including metallography, to understand the properties of the historical steel and to assess the propensity for lamellar tearing of the steel where welded. You'll leave with tips to develop your own testing matrix to determine the properties of the existing steel.

Christine Freisinger

12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Load Path

Load Path: Buildings
To maintain stability, structures require a complete load path that connects each point of load application to a point of resistance. Join us to examine load path concepts in steel buildings and draw upon real-world examples.

Mark Waggoner

2:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

Load Path

Load Path: Seismic 
Load paths connect each point of load application to a point of resistance--and in seismic design, every element with mass is considered a point of application and the foundation is considered the point of resistance. We'll focus on seismic load path and the role of diaphragms and their components, including chords, collectors, and collector connections.

Rafael Sabelli

2:45 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

Stability

The Big Five of Structural Stability: Direct Analysis Method
We'll discuss how to meet the Specification's five basic requirements of stability design using the direct analysis method by walking through the process of applying the direct analysis method to the design of a sample structural element. We'll also compare the load demands and strengths arising from the direct analysis method to those from a design using the effective length method to help you understand the advantages and disadvantages of both systems.

Ron Ziemian and Craig Quadrato

3:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Stability

The Big Five of Structural Stability: Effective Length Method
As a companion to the previous session, we'll discuss how to use the effective length method to meet the Specification's five basic requirements of stability design. After applying the effective length method to the design of a sample structural element, we'll compare the load demands and strengths from this method with those from a design using the direct analysis method.

Ron Ziemian and Craig Quadrato

4:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m.

Thursday, October 28

Track

Session

Speaker

Time (Eastern)

Stability

Cantilever and Overhanging Beam Design
Because the behavior of cantilever beams is different from that of simply supported beams, you must carefully evaluate your design assumptions for these members. The AISC Specification addresses only the simplest condition for cantilever beams, but designing them often requires considering the effects of load height, bracing within the span, and non-rigid warping restraint at the fixed end. Join the 2020 T.R. Higgins Lectureship Award winner for a look at the lateral-torsional buckling of both cantilever and overhanging beams. 

Bo Dowswell

11:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Stability

Roof Design for Ponding Loads
Upcoming editions of the AISC Specification and ASCE 7 will change how designs address roof ponding. Under the new provisions, the rain load will include the effects of ponding, which will (in many cases) eliminate the need to perform a separate ponding instability check. We'll review the basics of ponding, the upcoming code changes, and design tools (such as the SJI Roof Bay Analysis Tool) that will help engineers meet these new requirements. 

Mark Denavit

11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Load Path

Load Path: Connections
Larry Muir tries to boil connection load paths down into three simple steps...in 25 minutes. Let’s all wish him luck with that! 

Larry Muir

12:30 p.m.-1:00 p.m.

Load Path

Load Path: Industrial Buildings
Load paths for industrial buildings and non-building structures can pose a lot more challenges than the load paths for a typical low-rise steel building. We'll examine some potential solutions, from alternate horizontal diaphragms (i.e. horizontal trusses) to the atypical LFRS (i.e. mutli-tiered braced frames). 

Krunal Patel

2:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

Wrap-up Session

Wrap-up Roundtable: Connections
We'll round out the connections track with a review of key takeaways and some of the best questions raised in previous sessions. Our panel will also answer your outstanding questions during this interactive session. You can anticipate a lively conversation on the state of steel connection design!

Mara Braselton, Jonathan Hamann, Mike Kempfert

3:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Wrap-up Session

Wrap-up Roundtable: Potluck
End the Flash Steel Conference on a high note with an overview of key points and some of the best questions from the Conference--and if you have questions of your own, our panel will answer them for you. It'll be a great way to end this celebration of the state of today's steel design.

Ron Ziemian, Larry Muir, Bo Dowswell

4:15 p.m.-4:45 p.m.